The most venomous spider in the world seeks shelter in homes due to floods in Australia

  • toOlaf Kobacic

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The most venomous spiders in the world take refuge in people’s homes from floods in Australia.

The Australian city of Sydney is currently hit by floods again – after heavy rain. People have already been evacuated from several parts of the city and schools have had to close. But the water masses are by no means the only problem for the population. Because floods also affect animals. They take refuge in the buildings in large numbers. Including the most venomous spider in the world: the Sydney funnel.

13 people have died after being bitten by a funnel spider in Sydney. However, since 1981 – the year the antidote was developed – no deaths have been recorded. Lucky masked, two years ago, a ten-year-old Australian was bitten by Atrax Robusts He only survived because he received twelve potions of the antidote. Local media spoke of a “record”.

Kindly Sydney funnel spider (Atrax robustus)
incident about sydney australia
total length about eight centimeters (female)
food Arthropods, snails, and small vertebrates
The effect of the bite in humans Fatal without antitoxins

Unlike the world’s deadliest spider, outside the Sydney region of Australia, there is no danger to humans from encountering the highly venomous eight-legged creature. And even there – apart from the floods – there is almost one encounter when a male Sydney funnel-web spider searches for a mate. biologie-seite.de He writes: “While they roam, they often enter homes and are relatively aggressive.”

Floods in Australia: the world’s worst venomous spider seeks to get close to people

In general, it is the males of Sydney funnel spiders that pose a danger to humans. Although it is much smaller than the female, its venom is six times stronger. Like science.de Researchers led by Brian Fry of the University of Queensland in Brisbane report that oppressive web spiders “modified” delta-hexatoxin in their venom cocktail. So they were less used to catch prey, but rather a weapon against thieves.

Brian Fry explains that the male funnel spider in Sydney is more venomous science.de As follows: “When they are sexually mature, they leave their safe burrow and travel long distances in search of females. However, this migration is dangerous, because it is known that some vertebrates like to eat spiders. So spider venom serves to ward off predators. Unfortunately for humans , according to Fry – BECAUSE: “We are also vertebrates.”

The worst poisonous spider in the world: 40 people in Australia are bitten every year

Sydney funnel-web spiders can bite through shoe surfaces with their powerful jaw-dropping claws to inject their venom. A poison much more dangerous than the poison of the European black widow. Up to 40 people per year from Atrax Robusts to bite. However, the antidote is given only if the victim shows symptoms of poisoning. The reason: Not every bite from a Sydney funnel web spider includes a syringe. The initial symptoms of poisoning are:

  • sweating
  • Shortness of breath
  • Vomiting and nausea
  • Drooling and muscle twitching

After the initial symptoms appear, a venomous bite from a Sydney funnel web spider can cause confusion and facial numbness. If antidote treatment is not carried out, high blood pressure, rapid heartbeat and arrhythmia occur. In severe cases, there is a risk of heart attack, circulatory failure, coma and death.

Hunting behavior of funnel web spider in Sydney

Like all species of the family Atracidae, the Sydney funnel web spider hunts with a funnel web up to 60 cm long and ends in a self-digging burrow. In addition, they can also kill prey while roaming freely outside their shelter. Their diet includes beetles, crickets, centipedes, larvae of various insects, snails, frogs and small lizards.

But Sydney’s oppressive spider venom cocktail also seems to have a good side, eh nationalgeographic.de Reports: “According to previous research findings, it should help treat nerve damage after strokes or extend the durability of transplanted organs.”

Rule list photo: © Ken Griffiths

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