Animal rights activists from Segeberg infected chicken nurse

Stocksy/Daldorf. Anne Kristen Mohr carefully takes the weak hen out of the carriage box. When touched, it makes soft and sad sounds. The indifferent hen’s feathers are severely torn, the distended abdomen is bare. “She was rescued today from a laying hen farm in Schleswig-Holstein,” explains Anja Meffert. The two animal rights activists suspect the hen’s oviduct is blocked and inflamed. A new case of care for Meifert. Segeberger’s two women are involved in the non-profit Save the Chicken and have already acquired several chickens from laying farms.

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The two animal rights activists did not reveal the farm where the chickens were found. Only: “It’s in Schleswig-Holstein.” The association has been working with the Egg Company for several years and receives animals that show health problems during the periodic examination. If the chickens survive and are bred to restore health, they will be placed in a new home on a permanent basis, and Anja Meifert explains how to proceed. “You don’t have to go back to Hell.”

Segeberg animal rights activists criticize housing sheds

Anja Meffert lives in Daldorf and Anne Kristen Mohr in Stocksy. They both learned about Save the Chicken through a friend in 2019. The association is based in Wolfsburg, and members are organized regionally. The team in Schleswig-Holstein has about 15 members. Through their work, they want to educate them about conditions on spawning farms, Mohr and Meffert say.

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Anne-Christine Mohr of Stocksy (right) and Anja Meffert of Daldorf participate in Save the Chicken and adopt infected or abandoned laying hens. The two now healthy chickens “Miss Friday” and “Rosa” have found a new home in Stocksee.

“Earth maintenance is the worst,” says Anya Meffert. “A lot of people have completely wrong ideas about how to keep it.” Anne Kristen Moore makes no exception to this: “I used to think animals could walk pretty well on the ground there.” Often just dirty concrete, filled with feces. Hundreds, if not thousands, of animals were sitting on metal bars in a space as small as four levels in a dark barn, the two describing and showing pictures from some farms. Natural behaviour, such as scratching in the sand, is not possible for animals.

“The booze and forage are on the first floor,” says Ann-Christine Mohr. It’s not uncommon for there to be animals that can’t get there and eventually sit on the ground weak and get cut down by other chickens. “I stopped eating chicken after the first relief effort.” Mohr is now almost exclusively vegetarian. “The only exception is poultry eggs. So I know where they come from.”

New home for rescued chickens in Stocksy

Three brown chickens circulate around the Stocksee property in front of Mohr’s house: “Miss Friday,” “Miss Liberty,” and “Rosa.” “Miss Friday,” Mohr says, was found on Friday — off the farm. “It must have somehow got out through the compost conveyor belt.” It was totally filthy and exhausting. “I had to shower her twice.”

In turn, ‘Miss Liberty’ was the 500th hen in the alleged rescue – what animal rights activists call a laying hens rescue before they are officially removed from the stables and replaced with new hens. At this time, the animals are usually only 16 to 18 months old. “But they no longer lay an egg every day,” Moore explains, which is uneconomical for the farmer. Then the debarked chickens are sent to the slaughterhouse.

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The association Rettet das Huhn acquires the sorted chickens from some farms and gives them a home for a second life. According to the association, more than 111,000 animals were saved from slaughter.

The infected hen is tired of the laying farm

When rescuing chicks, animals are taken from farms for health reasons before the end of this “service period”. “It sounds horrible, but an injury is your ticket to freedom,” says Anja Meffert. As for the chickens, they took care of him that day. “I’ll take her to the vet right away,” Meifert says after they get a closer look at the animal. He is in poor condition and looks exhausted and appears to be in pain. “And all this so we can get cheap eggs,” says Miffert, who will take the chickens to Daldorf to be bred. I’ve already taken eleven chickens there.

Anne Kristen Mohr of Stocksy and Anja Meffert of Daldorf participate in Save the Chicken and take care of infected laying hens like this: the chickens are badly ripped and the abdomen is badly distended.  The animal is clearly in pain.  The two women suspected of having jam in the oviduct.

Anne-Christine Mohr of Stocksy and Anja Meffert of Daldorf participate in Save the Chicken and take care of infected laying hens like this: the chickens are badly ripped, the abdomen is badly distended. The animal is clearly in pain. The two women suspected of having jam in the oviduct.

Read more after the announcement

Read more after the announcement

“We’re looking for more supporters,” Miffert says. Both are for permanent admission of chickens and nurseries. Nurseries are all about caring for sick and injured animals. Often there are chickens with injuries or joint problems. It is mostly a temporary recording. “Veterinarian costs, for example, are covered by the association,” Meifert explains. Such temporary care is also possible in an apartment without a garden.

Adopting a chicken: mediate between Save the Chicken

However, anyone who permanently seizes a chicken needs a place to run and a stable. Anne Kristen Moore’s hens live behind the house under a canopy. Clear plastic panels and wire mesh protect against rain and enemies. Feeding containers hang from the ceiling, where chickens can pick lettuce or eat mealworms. There is a sandbox for bathing, a chicken house for sleeping, and an old breeding house where chickens still lay their eggs.

Anne Kristen Mohr gives her seeded laying hens a new home in Stocksy.

Anne Kristen Mohr gives her seeded laying hens a new home in Stocksy. Miss Friday, Miss Liberty, and Rosa are still busy laying eggs.

Whoever adopts a chicken bears full responsibility and future costs. “It’s like a dog or any other pet,” Mohr says. The lifespan of chickens from laying farms varies greatly. “A primitive chicken can live up to ten years.” But it could be five years. Her first two chickens, Frida and Paula, recently died after nearly three years. Mohr also wants to adopt more chickens in the future.

Interested parties can find regional contacts and requirements for adopting a chicken on the association’s website Rettet-das-Huhn.de. The contact for people from Segeberg in Kiel can be reached via the online contact form.

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